Part II: Steps to Save Money & Improve Care with Hospital Construction

By Todd Imming
(04/27/2016)
Here is Part II of a two-part series on seven steps to approach a hospital expansion or renovation project to get the best value from construction with the best solutions for your facility, staff and patients. Part I lists the first three steps and was published to the HealthCare Construction + Operations News website on March 16. It can be read here.
 

Chinese Hospital Opens New Patient Tower


(04/20/2016)
The Patient Tower at San Francisco’s Chinese Hospital in the Chinatown neighborhood, has completed a new building after being in the works for nearly 20 years. The last independent institution of its kind in San Francisco, will build a $180 million building with corridors connecting to the old Chinese Hospital located next door, according to SF Gate.
 

Navigator Program Helps Those with Behavioral Health Issues


(04/27/2016)
The behavioral health system partnered with insurance coverage can be difficult, so Provincetown Health System took action and created a program to help patients navigate the system. The Community Resource Navigator Program provides patients with a full-time employee who is able to use existing resources to assure that patients’ needs are met.
 

Parkland SICU Takes Part in ICU After-Care Initiative


(04/05/2016)
The Parkland Surgical Intensive Care Unit (SICU) is taking part in a new quality-improvement project called ICU Liberation, in hopes of improving the effects that intensive-care patients face after being released from the hospital. The Parkland SICU is one of 77 intensive-care units chosen by The Society of Critical Care Medicine to take part in the A-F Bundle Improvement Collaborative, an 18-month initiative to improve patient outcomes. The hospital is one of only two Texas ICUs to be chosen.
 

Detroit Medical Center Creates Cardboard City During Design


(03/30/2016)
The Detroit Medical Center’s Children’s Hospital of Michigan in Troy opened its doors on Feb. 1. Throughout the course of construction on the 63,000-square-foot hospital, the project team used lean design to lower the costs and decrease the building space required for the project.